Sunday, 13 January 2019

My Short Story, ‘An Ex Ordeal’, is available for Free Reading on Amazon Kindle


An ‘Ex’ Ordeal: A Short Story is my first eBook that is based on the emotional reflections of an ex-relationship. In ten pages, we get to read a short account of a woman in her sixties, addressing the scars her ex-marriage had left on her.
The book can come under contemporary literary fiction, for it is more of a contemplative self-conversation she has with herself than a narration of events. Separation being one of the most difficult personal life experiences, readers can feel a realistic connect to the protagonist’s complex thoughts.
Quick details of the book
Format: Kindle Edition
Genre: Contemporary Literary Fiction
No. of Pages: 10
Maximum Reading Time: 30 minutes
Price: Book is on a free promotion, that is, it is available for free reading for all currently, (Jan 10th – 15th 1.30 pm IST). At other times, it is free for Kindle Unlimited Subscribers, Rs. 49 for others.
Amazon Link to the Book: An ‘Ex’ Ordeal: A Short Story
Book Description & Book Cover: At the end of the post
Just another small step in my writing pursuit!
I didn’t plan to publish a short story in the eBook format; neither was it something like a long-time dream. It just happened. There came a swift flash of an idea and it got manifested in no time.
I consider this as a small step in my writing pursuits. The few days of my involvement in this work has brought important learnings for me – from getting to understand how self-publishing works to understanding the real pillars of my life. It is a beginning, and I am glad this happened for it has added to my interest to grow as a writer.
Request to readers
I know I am yet to evolve a lot more as a writer and a thinker to claim an authorship tag. I am at a point where sincere feedback is critical for my growth. To everyone who got to land on this page, this is my humble request to please have a read of An Ex Ordeal and give me your opinions.
Amazon Link to the Book: An ‘Ex’ Ordeal: A Short Story
I’ve made the eBook available for free from Jan 10th 1.30 pm IST to Jan 15th 1.30 pm IST. For kindle unlimited subscribers, it is free anytime.
It will be a great help if I can get a feedback by any or all of the options below:
  • As a comment to this post
  • To my email, nandhini.pfs@gmail.com
  • As an Amazon review
  • A review on Goodreads
  • A blog post on your blog/social media.
Book Description
Neeraja’s recurrent dream was a perfect reflection of her subconscious angst. In her dream, she would see Ravi, her ex-husband, from far and desperately wait for him to eye on her diamond wedding ring. There would be a compelling need in her to make him feel jealous of her precious possession.

The fact that she was once unsuccessful in her role as a wife defeated her self-pride. Her dreams echoed her longing need to prove Ravi her stance as a valuable partner. Witnessing him feel guilty for what he did in the past can only perhaps bring her subconscious anxiety to peace.

Strangely, when Neeraja and Ravi meet after thirty years, their chance encounter makes her to see through the layers of her buried emotions which leaves her baffled with the important insights she discovers in the process.

An ‘Ex’ Ordeal is a reflective short story on separation and the trajectory of its scars over time. D
Book Cover

Tuesday, 23 October 2018

Randomly Ordered by Karthik Pasupathy: Book Review

What if there was a means to record our thought process and we get to replay it in the form of a novella? Randomly Ordered is one such recording of one person's thought process that happens on one ordinary day. 


As Karthik wakes up and goes around through his daily routine, he narrates what goes around within his mind. His day covers the morning hours of getting ready to office, a small glitch while traveling to his office, his observations at the office, another discrepancy that he needs to attend to back at home, his travel back home and his late evening hours with his mom at home. Pretty much, an ordinary day, as it sounds! 

One can imagine the story line to be a mundane journal of one person. But, I would rather look at this work a step beyond a journal writing. Randomly ordered isn't about what happened on that one day in Karthik's life. It is more about how Karthik perceived the situations that every big and small turns of that one day had brought with it. It is about a process that happens within you, me and everyone in this world. It is about the thousands of unspoken words that go hidden behind a handful of words which we would use if we were to describe a day's routine. 

Sunday, 7 August 2016

The Story of A Suicide by Sriram Ayer: Book Review




"Adida avala, vetra avala...." (Translation: Beat her, kill her) is a popular Tamil movie number starring Dhanush. Recently, I heard a 5-year old boy singing this song to his play mates at our children's park against a little girl because she wouldn't give way for them to play in the sand.

Imagine these little children growing up imbibing such attitudes from films and observing other male relations in their families. 'When a woman doesn't comply to his wish, hurt her' is what is seeded in their minds which becomes the reason behind several acid attacks, rape, murder cases and stalking. 

And this is in fact happened in the Swathi murder case recently in Chennai!

Tuesday, 19 July 2016

The Tantric Curse by Anupama Garg: Book Review




This review is also published at my Personal Blog, Pages from Serendipity.

I could not have written this review on a better day for it's Gurupurnima tonight!

As the cover image and book title reveals, the tantric curse is about tantra, one of the spiritual  practices originating from India. The word 'Tantra' is most often associated with the fear of an unknown realm of mysticism. Another common mis-association with tantric rituals is sex. 

Author Anupama, a tantric herself, writes with deliberate sincerity the reality behind the concept, practices and rituals of tantra, in her debut fiction, the tantric curse. At the end of the book, one can certainly attain a clarity on the subject, not by enforcement or judgement but by acceptance of the truthfulness in the author's words.

Irrespective of whether a reader has an inclination towards tantra or not, this book can offer profound knowledge about the basics of spirituality. 

Sunday, 5 June 2016

‘After the Floods’ – An Anthology of Short Stories by The Chennai Bloggers Club available @Chennai Book Fair (7th – 13th June)

Image Credit: Crazy Studios


The much-awaited anthology of short stories by the Chennai Bloggers Club (details below) will be available at the Chennai Book Fair from the 7th – 13th June, 2016.
Please visit stall by Sixth Sense Publications (Nos. 350, 351, 442, 443) to buy your copy.
Contact: Mr. V. Pandian - 7200050073/ Mr. R. Murugan - 7200073076
Venue: Island Grounds, Chennai




Below is the layout of the Chennai Book Fair, 2016. 
Stalls 350, 351, 442 and 443 where the book is available for purchase, are highlighted in red. 

Courtesy: http://bapasi.com/

Authored by Members of The Chennai Bloggers Club


Edited by Mahesh Lakshmanan
Book Cover Design by Kishor LN
The trials, emotions and triumph of the city of Chennai, stirred by the 2015 floods, have been thoughtfully manifested into an anthology of short stories by The Chennai Bloggers Club (CBC). ‘After the Floods’ , available at the Chennai Book Fair from 7th - 13th June, 2016, is authored by twenty bloggers of CBC who have earnestly brought out the voice of Chennai in their stories. Written in diverse genres, the anthology is certain to delight readers of various interests. While the book is awaiting its release, next month, I request all of you to watch out for updates about the release or bookmark this page for updates.
Did I miss to mention that I am one among the 20 authors?! Yeah, I feel excited to be a part of this and glad, for this will be my third short story publication.

About the Book

In late November 2015, Chennai was hit by rains of unprecedented proportions. Even before the rain waters could drain away properly, December saw severe rains caused by a cyclone. The streets were flooded and thousands lost their homes and livelihoods. Chennai picked herself up and inspired the world around her.

The Chennai Bloggers Club (CBC) is bringing out this anthology of short stories inspired by the floods. Each story has been penned by a different blogger from CBC. The tales have just one core message – “We shall overcome and stand united as a city that cares for itself.”

Authors

Sai Sriram Pavithraa Swaminathan Nandhini Chandrasekaran Meera Shivashankar Dhivya Balaji Kavipriya Moorthy Sowmya S Sundaram Lakshmi Venkatraman Salesh Dipak Fernando Madhvi Kumar Karthik Pasupathy Umasree Raghunath Srilakshmi Indrasenan Asha Sunil Sai Shyam Kishor Lakshminarayanan Clement Williams Sriram Acharya Destination Infinity Gayathri LakshimarayananDeepanarayanan & Mahendran Meera Rajagopalan Bragadeesh Prasanna

(This post was originally published in my personal blog, Pages from Serendipity)

Saturday, 21 May 2016

300 Days by Bragadeesh Prasanna

300 Days is a simple love story of Jai and Sravani. While Sravani is struggling within a confined relationship with Sai, Jai hopes to win Sravani's love. In contrary to the usual, complicated triangular love stories, 300 days sets off  with a smooth sail between the two main characters. Following cycles of love and separation, whether Jai finally wins her love is the rest of the story. 

The book stands out in realistically depicting the emotions beneath seven gradual stages of love as enumerated in Arabic literature, namely,
Hub - Attraction
Uns - Infatuation
Ishq - Love
Aqeedat - Reverence
Ibaadat - Worship
Junoon - Obsession
Maut - Death

(Though the course of the novel is subtitled according to the seven stages, one cannot find a brief explanation about the same in the book. However, the author, in his blog, shares his inspiration behind adapting the concept). 

300 Days is author Bragadeesh Prasanna's first book. As a debut author, he has proved his stand as a writer and as an earnest narrator. 


Jai and Sravani meet during a trek. Without much magical drama, their story begins in the backdrop of the Orkut era. As a subtle emotional bond connects them through text messages and late night calls, Sravani's difficult relationship with Sai gradually unfolds in the novel, leaving a temporary crisis in Jai's and Sravani's lives. A few of Jai's long-time acquaintances and their love lives fill the space before the revival of the main love story. The end is certainly an unexpected one, though the character of Jai shall leave a respectful mark in the readers' minds. 

Watch the Book video trailer


300 Days is not a tale of a teen love. Said that the maturity and seriousness of relationships are well-carried from page one. Little gestures that speak of how a relationship between a boy and girl develops and how their dependency gradually becomes an obsession are expressed beautifully. As the relationship reaches a much serious stage, the dilemmas, frustrations and void that matters of love carry are brought-out well too. Readers who are going through or have experienced similar emotions might find delving into Jai's psyche interesting. Most notably, this book can give insights into when love can be chased and when the chase needs to be withdrawn. 

However, what the book lacks seriously is a well-defined plot. At one point in the reading, the book loses the significance of the story-line, making it more like a personal journal of the protagonist rather than a novel. Though the narration started off well, the detailed chat messages and voice calls having extended for long stretches make a few chapters a mundane reading. The only grip factor that sustains reading is the curiosity of the climax while most of the in-between parts failed to elicit reading anticipation. 

Almost most part of the narration is in the form of dialogues and author Bragadeesh's ease of dialogue writing is admirable. The effortless and charming writing style makes the flow unstoppable. Beyond all other remarks, the narration deserves an honour for the warmth and honesty in it!

A few excerpts from the book:

"Hello" I said with a trembling voice......I had lived in the vain hope of this moment since almost a year.....I didn't jump in joy or run around my office building screaming my lungs out. I just laughed. I laughed like I had just seen the world for first time. 
"All of us have some unanswered questions, right? When something happens to us with no explanation we keep wondering for the rest of our lives. we dream of an apology or an explanation from the person who did it to us."
For a debut work, 300 Days is notable!


Title: 300 Days
Author: Bragadeesh Prasanna
Publisher: Self-published
Pages: 402


Author Connect







Buy Online



About the Book

300 Days follows the life of protagonist Jai and his relationship with Sravani, who is from a different culture. He gets to spend only 300 days with her while crossing all the seven stages of love. Can love transcend cultures, age barriers, distance and language? Will Jai be able to cross all the barriers while in a long distance relationship with Sravani?


Saturday, 23 April 2016

A Tribute to my Memorable Classical Authors on World Book Day

I must have been eleven years old when I read a full-length novel, for the first time. I remember it was on of those Secret Seven series by Enid Blyton. Though others of my age had a craze on Famous Five, Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys, I regarded Secret Seven closer to my heart. In the years that followed, Agatha Christie's were my second memorable collection of fiction. 

I wonder how rich my dad should have been to have taken me to Nungambakam Landmark and Mount Road Higginbothams every weekend in the 1980s! Ages eleven to seventeen were when I have skipped food, remained awake through nights and talked insanely about the crush I had for a few of the characters. However, until recently, I didn't know Enid Blyton and Agatha Christie were women. Yes, I assumed them to be male authors all along. 

For all the memorable moments of imagination, such authors have blessed me in my formative years, I dedicate this post on World Book Day, by bringing up their faces for readers like me who often overlooked the person who held the pen behind our childhood reads. 


Enid Blyton


My very first reads were your's. I owe everything I know and feel about books to you!



Agatha Christie


Even now, sometimes I plot a murder tale in my mind when I am doing nothing and lost in thoughts. When I come back to my senses, I laugh at myself of how a writer I read in my childhood continues to inspire me after years. 



Charles Dickens


We were in class XI, the first year of schooling when a Non-detail section for English language was introduced. Oliver Twist was the first tale our class read together for a year long. Hugely memorable! I remember the times when a classmate cried when Oliver was beaten for asking more porridge and the whole class observing mourning when Nancy, our favourite character, passed away. 



Emily Bronte


How did you create history with a single novel?!!! I don't exactly remember the story of Wuthering Heights today, but the sadness that I felt for Catharine is still deep within me. 



R.K.Narayan


I am not going to tell you that I remember you for reading Malgudi Days. I am here today to confess that I've missed to read your books inspite of hearing the legendary tales about your writing since childhood. 


Glad to have shared my recollection of the authors who I've heard most during my childhood on World Book Day. Will be interesting to know similar childhood book memories from all of you. 

Friday, 22 April 2016

Releasing on 1st May, 2016: The Wedding Photographer By Sakshama Puri Dhariwal



Do you love Bollywood? 

Do you love romantic comedies? 

Do you love books? 

Then this one's for you! 



Presenting Sakshama Puri Dhariwal's debut novel
'The Wedding Photographer', releasing this May.


A delicious, Breezy novel full of Fun, Sass, Heart and Wit

Penguin Books India presents

THE WEDDING PHOTOGRAPHER
By
Sakshama Puri Dhariwal


  
A fantastic debut with wedding, love, photography, scandal and cricket – a perfect summer read!

Sunday, 14 February 2016

Songs of the Mist: Volume 1 (The Monk Key Series) by Shashi


How often do we hear people fret about stressful life situations! So were the characters of the Songs of the Mist, to begin with. However, how often do we hear such people making a journey towards the Himalayas, the abode of self-realization? That's where our characters make a difference.

If you are in the process of finding  a book written with practical wisdom to aid your spiritual quests, be sure you've already reached the first step in your quest. Songs of the mist shall clear the initial mental anxieties that a seeker faces, shall make one feel consoled that after all, there are several others who are struggling with similar uncertainties of life. 

Songs of the Mist: Volume I is the first of the three-part Monk Key series. 

Wednesday, 10 February 2016

Just You, Me and a Secret by Ganga Bharani Vasudevan: Book Review



Just You, Me and a Secret marks a history in my book reading experience for two reasons: This is the first complete book I've read in the digital format through Amazon Kindle Unlimited. And the first book I've read without taking a break because I just couldn't. 
Just You, Me and a Secret is a psychological romantic thriller in which the protagonist, after losing her memory in an accident, tries to regain her lost identity. Shuttling in between whether to trust or not the stories told by people around her, she finally arrives at a point where she understands what has been done to her while she remained unconscious. 

Author Ganga Bharani, as a debutante, has proved to the literary world, "Man, I have a great plot and I can write in flawless English. That was all it required to write a fantastic book."

Wednesday, 3 February 2016

Ramayana: The Game of Life - Book 3 - Stolen Hope by Shubha Vilas: Book Review

As the reading continues, the deer on the footnote on the page continues to move as well, walking, running, leaping and finally gets attacked by an arrow on the last page. Sometimes, I could relate the state of the deer to the intensity of my absorption into the book. And on the last page, I felt disappointed, like the wounded deer, that the book and mostly, my learning had to come to an end. 

Re-telling Ramayana was a part of the author's intention. Yes, only a part! And the rest was imparting wisdom to the readers about significant nuances of our everyday lives. As a spiritual seeker, it has come naturally to Author Shubha Vilas.

Ramayana: The Game of Life - Stolen Hope is the third of the six Ramayana series by the author. 

Monday, 25 January 2016

KLASS by Prita Yadav: Book Review


KLASS is a sports school in Pune where our protagonist, Jolene Jordan, is forced to join, by her father. Jo is determined to behave as bad as she could at her new school, hoping she will be soon expelled by the school authorities. However, the events that follow bring unexpected turns in her life and the book temporarily ends at the end of the first year of her schooling, making the readers curious for the next in the KLASS series. 

Halfway through the book, without the reader’s realization, she/he would be watching a vivid movie about KLASS. The narration is so full of life that the reading experience surpasses beyond words to render an in-depth visualization of the scenes. Friendship, rivalry, hatred, love, passion – human emotions have been well-placed throughout the plot. 

Most part of the book is in the form of conversation between the n number of characters of students and teachers at KLASS. Yet, each character is marked as a unique personality. And that’s where author Prita stands out as an extraordinary debut author. 

Thursday, 14 January 2016

Nandhini's Book Reviews: 2015


Nandhini's Book Reviews completes 2 years. Amidst running behind a toddler, I am surprised that could review 25 books this year. When I look back, I don't even remember a day when I sat for more than an hour at one place with a book :) 

My heart-felt thanks to all the authors and publishers who reached out to me for reviewing this year. Every time I receive a book for review, I admire the perseverance and efforts that the authors must have poured in for their work to get published. As always, I cherished receiving free books and connecting with authors about their writing experiences. And as always, it was fascinating to realize how modest many were in re-telling their mighty tales. 

Here's a quick look into Nandhini's Book Reviews in 2015:


Book Genres of 2015


Mythological fiction has been creating a revolution among book genres in India, in the last few years. Though it demands time, I love getting deeply involved in a different period of time. I reviewed three from this genre in 2015:


I am grateful to these authors because many of us could get enlightened about a rich and fascinating past. The Curse of Brahma was a well-written and captivating fiction about the happenings before Lord Krishna's birth. The Rigveda Code was a fast-paced and interesting read about what happens years after Lord Krishna's demise. The Guardians of the Halahala surpassed all of the books I've read in this genre. 

Apart from Santosh Avvanavar books, other reviewed books that were based on societal themes and social causes were: 

Both were touchingly written and true eye openers. The Bride of Amman was a realistic fiction of how women and homosexuals are treated in the orthodox society of Jordan. The Silent Scream had my heart sink with a child sex abuse tale that keeps happening all around us but hardly gets a rescue. 

The women-centric books reviewed in 2015 were:

There's Something About You is not exactly women-centric but of a bold girls's story. The Other End of the Corridor is a story of an ordinary housewife who faces domestic abuse by her husband but finally manages to prove her self-worth. Unravelling Anjali is an interesting fiction of a new NRI bride, of she adapts to an unloving married life in Australia. Finding Ecstasy is discussed below under Memoirs.

A new genre I tried in 2015 was poetry collection. I wasn't a great fan of poetry earlier but Night Sky Between The Stars by Usha Kishore impressed me enough to become one. It speaks of Indian womanhood and how masculine supremacy has written the fate of Indian society.  
The Inscrutable Mulla Nasrudin Episodes by Jyothirllata Girija was another I reviewed in the same genre. It was a nice and witty poetry collection.

Another sort of new genre was text collection. I was in awe for Our Heritage Revisited by Anju Saha for her brief compilation of huge volumes of ancient Hindu texts.

Memoirs was yet another new genre in 2015. Finding Ecstasy by Rebecca Pillsbury  was about a woman who grows up with guilt and fear of sexuality and gradually wins her negativity and emotions. Grey & White Day Scholar by Raj Sekar was a good memoir of a middle-age man who goes back to his school to reconnect with his childhood friends.
The Prism of Life by Ansh Das was the only self-help/Spirituality book I reviewed in 2015. It was worth spending time in this short and quick read.

Favourite Book and Author of 2015



My favourite book of 2015 was Blame it on Destiny by Soorina Desai and of course, author Soorina Desai becomes my favourite author as well, not only for her stunning narrating style but also for her personal touch in connecting with a reviewer of her book. Blame it on Destiny was a breath-taking fiction with an intricately-woven plot. It shall forever stand out apart in my book shelf!

Most-reviewed Author of 2015



I need to make a special mention of author Santosh Avvanavar for I reviewed 8 of his books in 2015:

Most were simple short stories that addressed a social problem in the country. Though light and quick reads, I respect the meaning and depth of the subjects in all his books.


What was unique about book reviewing in 2015?



I am not much of a book tour participant. For the first time, I signed up with b00k r3vi3w Tours and Indi Book Reviews in 2015. 

I am glad that my review of Night Sky Between The Stars by Usha Kishore could make to the December 2015 edition of Tajmahal Book Review Journal.

And book editing opportunities from two publishers were memorable of 2015!


Tuesday, 5 January 2016

Autobiography of a Yogi by Sri Sri Paramahansa Yogananda: A Tribute


We keep hearing about spirituality, yoga, meditation, kundalini awakening and salvation. For those of you who are vaguely knowledged about such terms but seeking a reliable source of sensible and practical information, Autobiography of a Yogi is a great choice. If you expect a yogi's autobiography to be a boring account of how he found God, this shall be a different kind of an autobiography for you. 

To clear any prejudice you might be having towards picking up this book:

  • You need not be a follower of Paramahansa Yogananda 
  • You don't have to have an opinion about how good a spiritual master he is. 
  • You really don't have to know a word on spirituality.
  • The book is not about Hinduism. In fact, more Biblical references than Hindu scriptures can be found throughout the book.


The book doesn't teach you to become a yogi. Rather, Paramahansa Yogananda discusses his spiritual affiliation since childhood, scientific and logical explanations about meditation, breathing techniques, past lives, reincarnation, astrology and his experiences of meeting other revered masters of India and elsewhere.

Saturday, 2 January 2016

I don't wear sunscreen by Kavipriya Moorthy: Book Review

Two girls being friends since childhood is a unique relationship. They would hold hands while walking on the road; they would feel jealous when the other gets closer to a new acquaintance and they can't blurt their hearts out better to anybody else.

There hasn't been a formal proposal yet between the boy and the girl. But their relationship is apparently heading a romantic way. They know that it's only a matter of time before the ice gets broken and they are relishing the best phase of their love story. 

All of a sudden, after a train journey, the would-be boyfriend becomes a question mark, the job that she's been dedicated to, slips away and eventually, the best friend walks away from her life. To add to her misery, she is confused without the missing links which she suspects to be connecting the circumstances. And she ends up in a neurotic state. 

I don't wear Sunscreen is a fast-paced tale of Lakshya which carries, till its last page, emotions and suspense of  a myriad of things that could happen to a young Indian girl.

Friday, 25 December 2015

The Bride of Amman by Fadi Zaghmout, translated from Arabic by Ruth Ahmedzai Kemp: Book Review


Passed university with distinction? Good, you are well enough a bride material now.
Thirty and unmarried? Bad, you've almost reached your expiry date.
Did your father take your virginity? It's okay. Keep quiet.
Do you love someone of another religion?  Beware,you might be soon ostracized from your society.
Are you attracted towards the same sex as your's? Worse, control yourself, get married and have children. 


Author Fadi Zaghmout shares such social taboos that have confined young Arab men and women to the deepest corners of their beings. The Bride of Amman is a tale of five young dwellers of Amman, the capital city of Jordan where gender inequality and gender discrimination, make them struggle through their everyday lives. 

Published originally in Arabic, the book is translated by Ruth Ahmedzai Kemp.

Monday, 14 December 2015

Title is Untitled by Santosh Avvannavar, Kundan Srivastava & Raghunath Babu Are: Book Review


Santosh, an author dedicated to bringing into awareness the social crimes and injustice in India, has teamed with Kundan Srivastava & Raghunath Babu Are in Title is Untitled. The authors have come up with 11 short fictions in the book that highlight how women in India become victims of rape and forced marriages. The stories also speak of how some women unlawfully misuse women-centric laws like dowry laws in their favour. Yet, other stories, on a lighter side, underline how shallow Indian education system is and ironically, how deep the Indian Beggary system is.


Written with utmost sincerity, the book is sure to churn your feelings towards such victims. At the end of each story, through the Dear 'No Light' Diary, the authors present brief facts about the issue related to the particular story. I appreciate their thoughtful efforts in collecting the data.

As I always recommend, please try to imbibe the authors' messages from this book and spread them as far as you can.

Friday, 11 December 2015

Our Heritage Revisited by Anju Saha: Book Review

Most of us including me, if asked which Hindu texts we are aware of, would have Mahabharata and Ramayana in our answers. If asked twice, we may answer Vedas but then we wouldn't know any other word about the Vedas. 

For centuries, we have cornered ancient Hindu scriptures to temple priests. Of course, unfortunately, not all of us are permitted to acquire and practice the knowledge of Vedas. However, isn't it good to learn what in the first place Vedas and Upanishads are? 


That's what Author Anju Saha does in her book, Our Heritage Revisited! She takes us through an easy and comfortable ride into the world of ancient Hindu scriptures. If you've felt guilty for being ignorant of them all these years, here's the right tool for you.